south african wines,tara hill wine, ready steady red wine, ready steady white wine, imagine wine, marimba wine,paarl,south africa,southern sky wines
Southern Sky Wines

Brands Wine and FoodI Love WineBulk Wine Media Library
Links Contact

HOME

 
Newsletter
Stay up to date with all the latest
Southern Sky Wine news and events click here>>
 
Competition
 

 

southern sky wines
About Southern Sky Wines
Pairing Guidelines
Food and wine are intrinsically linked so choose a wine that complements the meal and brings out the best in the food’s flavours.
The guidelines below will steer you in the right direction.

 
Pair wines and foods of the same flavours
Similar food and wine flavours complement each other. Sole with lemon sauce and Sauvignon Blanc both have citrus flavours

 
Pair wines and foods with the same weight/texture
Similarly weighted food and wine complement each other. Food and wine can be light, medium or heavy-bodied. Lobster and Chardonnay are both medium-weight and rich so they complement each other.

 
Pair wines and foods with the same sweetness level
Wine should be equal to or higher in sugar than the dish. Roasted pork with apple glaze pairs beautifully with Riesling.

 

Salt
Crisp wines balance salty flavors. A crisp Sauvignon Blanc balances salty olives and feta cheese.

Sauces
Pair the wine to the sauce served.
Light citrus sauces pair with Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay.
Heavy cream and mushroom sauces are ideal with Chardonnay and Pinot Noir.
Red and meat sauces match Merlot, Cabernet and Syrah.

Protein
Match wine to meat, fish or poultry when serving without a sauce. Pinot Noir tastes great with duck.

Spicy Food
Sweeter wines offer relief from spicy foods. Riesling pairs well with Asian cuisines.

Tannins
Tannic wines such as Cabernet Sauvignon cut through the coating that fat leaves in the mouth. Cabernet pairs great with steak.

Colour
Nature has colour-coded fruit and vegetables with the wine best suited to their flavors. Sauvignon Blanc is pale yellow and pairs well with citrus.

Acid
Wine should be equal to, or higher, in acid than the dish. A perfect example is pairing Pinot Noir with tomato tapenade.

 
 
cheese/nut feta
goat cheese
pine nuts
Asiago
havarti
almonds
havarti
Gouda
candied walnuts
meat/fowl chicken
turkey
veal
chicken
pork
smoked sausage
duck
seafood sole
oysters
scallops
halibut
shrimp
crab
sea bass
trout
veggie/fruit citrus
green apple
asparagus
potato
apple
squash
mango
apricots
chili peppers
pears
herb/spice chives
tarragon
cilantro
tarragon
sesame
basil
rosemary
ginger
sauces citrus
light sauces
cream sauce
pesto
sweet BBQ
spicy
chutney
desserts sorbet
key lime pie
banana bread
vanilla pudding
apple pie
carmel sauce
 
 
 
Pinot Noir
Syrah
Cabernet Sauvignon
cheese/nut goat cheese
Brie
walnuts
sharp cheddar
Roquefort
hazelnuts
Parmesan
Romano
chestnuts
cheddar
Gorgonzola
walnuts
meat/fowl lamb
sausage
filet mignon
chicken
roast game
pepperoni
spicy sausage
grilled meats
steak
venison
rib eye
beef stew
seafood orange roughy
tuna
salmon grilled swordfish
tuna
grilled tuna
veggie/fruit mushrooms
dried fruit
figs
strawberries
currants
stewed tomatoes
beets
carmelized onions
tomatoes
plums
black cherries
broccoli
tomatoes
herb/spice nutmeg
cinnamon
clove
oregano
sage
mint
rosemary
Juniper
rosemary
Juniper
lavender
sauces mushroom sauce
light-medium
red sauce
heavy sauce
red sauce
Barbeque
bolognese
bearnaise
brown sauce
tomato sauce
desserts creme brulee
white chcolate
Black Forest
cake
rhubarb pie
dark chocolate
berries
fondue
apple pie
carmel sauce
tara hill
imagine
imagine
marimba
marimba
ready steady red and white
ready steady red and white
 
 
 
 
 
   

 

tara hill imagine marimba ready steady white and red